Forensic Science Programs

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If you are adept at science and interested in crime solving, but don’t know what to do with your skills, then you may want to consider forensic science programs at various colleges and universities. As a forensic scientist, you would be responsible for collecting and analyzing various pieces of physical evidence that have been left behind at crime scenes. It is a very important job, as the development of modern technology has made complex science a huge part of modern crime fighting and solving.  Degree Requirements  If you want to go into forensic science, you cannot just complete a diploma, certificate or associate’s degree; you will need to complete at least a four-year bachelor’s degree to begin working in this field as a forensic scientist. There are programs that are dedicated to forensic science in the criminal justice departments of various colleges, but not all forensic scientists have entered into the field this way. Many forensic scientists completed a degree in biology, chemistry, genetics, physics, medical technology or microbiology, and then they trained to enter the field of forensics using their specialized knowledge. If you really want to increase your earning potential or get into the most prestigious management positions in this field, however, you will need to go the extra mile and get a master’s degree. This will take another two to three years after the bachelor’s degree, but many find that it is well worth the additional effort because of the new doors that it opens for them.

Skills for the Job Becoming a forensic scientist takes more than just the right degree. You will need to cultivate people skills to work with a variety of personalities, and you’ll need communication skills to write reports or testify in court. You will also need to have a thick skin to deal with sometimes difficult pieces of evidence.  The Rewards of the Job If you are a good forensic scientist, you can expect the hard work of education and training to pay off. The majority of forensic scientists work in state or federal crime labs. Most forensic scientists earn between $35,000 and $50,000 annually. Considering the medical and retirement benefits, not to mention the fact that you’re helping to keep a peaceful society, it is a very rewarding job. If this sounds like a career that could be right for you, there are many forensic science programs available to help get you there.
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A Computer Science Major Is An Excellent Choice In Starting A Career

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If you are a high school senior choosing a major for college, or a grownup who's life needs a new direction, you may want to take a look at the career paths you are able to follow with a computer science degree. A BS in computer science can result in a variety of jobs within the information technology industry, a few of which are well worth the investment! The first step is determining which place to go to school and which path is the best for you!  Choosing a college is always a difficult decision. Price is in most cases the determining factor, but you should look at the reputation of the school's degree program, too. You ought to pick a school having a challenging curriculum, one which will push your abilities to the maximum extent. You ought to additionally think about their job placement program for after graduation. The employment market is very competitive nowadays, any help that provides you an advantage can make a difference!  So, which kind of person should pursue a college degree in computer science? Obviously, you ought to be familiar with computers. Not only the games on them or surfing the web, but truly have an interest with the way they work and the software and programs that guide them. You ought to be detail-oriented and able to think outside the box. Most importantly, you should like what you do. This is what will result in a successful and worthwhile job.

A computer science degree can be attained in 2 to 4 years, depending upon whether you want an associates degree or bachelor's degree. Which degree you go after will likely be decided through your personal circumstances. However, it ought to be noted that a 4-year degree will offer you probably the most possibilities.  You will be required to take various sorts of courses in order to receive a computer science degree. Along with the compulsory courses (English, Speech, and general science courses), you'll be taking a lot of math and technical classes. Everything from calculus and trigonometry to web design and software development programs should be taken sooner or later.  Which kind of jobs can you apply for once you have graduated? There are numerous career avenues you can take with a degree of this sort. It all is determined by where your interests lie. Software engineers or architects, program analysts, IT project managers and directors, as well as web developers all have degrees in computer science. Salaries range from $50,000 to over $110,000 yearly.

Remember, too, that computer science is an improving field. As technology are created, there will be a greater requirement for specialist and experts to develop software, write programs, repair equipment, and take charge of projects. A computer science degree offers the possibility of career development and growth via a lifetime.  If you are considering a career in one of these fields, you should schedule an appointment to talk with an academic adviser at a school near year. You can discuss the courses, time frames for graduation, as well as financial aid opportunities should you need them. Going to school, whether it is the very first time or coming back, is an important decision that should not be taken lightly. It is definitely a commitment, but well worth it in the end.  Gaining an education is a good stepping stone to getting into the career field that you desire. For some technical careers an information management degree or computer science major is essential.
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Adding the Wonder of Science to the Early Childhood Classroom.

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Montessori course Life science comprises the exploration of the senses,of living and non-living things, plants and animals, their features, uniqueness, and classifications.Theme:Seeds,Plants,& Insects Sample Teacher-Guided Lesson:Seeds Show seed packets or bags for kids to inspect.Ask what they notice.Extend on each kid's observation by asking another open-ended question. Then, place a uddle of seeds on a small tray.Have kids arrange them by size,color, and shape,and then try to match the seeds with the fruit or vegetable packets from which they came.Next,provide various fruits and vegetables or ask kids to bring them from home.Students can search for and take out the seeds from the fruits and vegetables and use them for their own autonomous explorations. Life Science Center for Independent Investigations Place mixed live plants,and a collection of baskets filled with dehydrated grass,leaves,vines,and bark in the center along with books and charts of plants and insects.Provide a variety of seeds,cups,spoons,and soil.Gather caterpillars and other insects along with small portions of their natural habitat and food for daily study and then release.Provide kids time to plant seeds,study the plants and insects,look them up in resource books,sketch them,evaluate and distinguish them,and talk about their findings. Earth Science by nursery teacher training Integrated in earth science are the investigation of air and water,sand and soil,day and night,and the seasons. Theme:Water Wonder Sample Teacher Guided Lesson: Sink or Float? Provide a pan of water, toothpicks, craft sticks, tongue depressors, and modeling clay. Ask kids to try each wooden stick to find out if it floats or sinks.Then,have them roll clay balls in graduated sizes from very tiny ones to two-inch balls. After formulating predictions, test and then discuss what take place to each ball when tested.Ask,-œDoes it go down or float? Why?-let kids to reveal on their experiences and observations. Independent Investigations Provide each group of kids with a small container of water, manipulative, and an inspection chart divided in half with the words sink or float and an equivalent picture of something sinking and something floating. Ask kids to make calculations, test objects, and then trace their observations on the chart using words and pictures to write about their findings. Physical Science by pre primary teacher training course Physical science comprises the study and explanation of matter,of energy,movement,and change.Theme:Magnets Sample Teacher-Guided Lesson:Mighty Magnets Display assorted art supplies. Glue two pieces of paper together and ask:-œWhat makes these pages stick together? What else can hold paper together,momentarily or permanently?- Provide time for kids to look at the art supplies,think,and answer.Explain that some objects hold together without glue,staples,or tape.They seem to hold together all by themselves.Show various magnets,and ask volunteers to select one to plunge into a container of mixed thumbtacks and paper clips.Provide time for the kids to explain what happens.Ask volunteers to select a magnet and try to pick up objects from a tray of manipulative.Talk about each object and whether or not it is attracted by the magnet.Have kids sort the objects into magnetize and not attract piles. 
As they look at the piles ask kids what they can wind up about magnets.Physical Science Center for Independent Investigations Provide different magnets such as a magnetic wand, a bar magnet, a magnetic marble,and a magnetic button and a box of paper clips. Kids envisage how many clips each magnet will magnetize and then find out how many clips are attracted to their magnets by experimenting with each.Kids count and write or draw the number of clips attracted to their magnets and then evaluate results and discuss:-œWhich magnet attracted the most clips?Which magnets were stronger,more dominant?Which were weaker?-rent magnets such as a magnetic wand, a bar magnet, a magnetic marble,and a magnetic button and a box of paper clips.Kids envisage how many clips each magnet will magnetize and then find out how many clips are attracted to their magnets by experimenting with each.Kids count and write or draw the number of clips attracted to their magnets and then evaluate results and discuss:-œWhich magnet attracted the most clips?Which magnets were stronger,more dominant?Which were weaker?-">Types of Science Explorations Science in early childhood includes life science, earth science, and physical science.With the previous information in mind on how kids learn best,the following activities by early childhood education symbolize significant discovery teachers and kids may want to try. Life Science by Montessori course Life science comprises the exploration of the senses,of living and non-living things, plants and animals, their features, uniqueness, and classifications.Theme:Seeds,Plants,& Insects Sample Teacher-Guided Lesson:Seeds Show seed packets or bags for kids to inspect.Ask what they notice.Extend on each kid's observation by asking another open-ended question. Then,place a uddle of seeds on a small tray.Have kids arrange them by size,color, and shape,and then try to match the seeds with the fruit or vegetable packets from which they came.Next,provide various fruits and vegetables or ask kids to bring them from home.Students can search for and take out the seeds from the fruits and vegetables and use them for their own autonomous explorations. Life Science Center for Independent Investigations Place mixed live plants,and a collection of baskets filled with dehydrated grass,leaves,vines,and bark in the center along with books and charts of plants and insects.Provide a variety of seeds,cups,spoons,and soil.Gather caterpillars and other insects along with small portions of their natural habitat and food for daily study and then release.Provide kids time to plant seeds,study the plants and insects,look them up in resource books,sketch them,evaluate and distinguish them,and talk about their findings. Earth Science by nursery teacher training Integrated in earth science are the investigation of air and water,sand and soil,day and night,and the seasons. Theme:Water Wonder Sample Teacher Guided Lesson: Sink or Float? Provide a pan of water, toothpicks, craft sticks, tongue depressors, and modeling clay. Ask kids to try each wooden stick to find out if it floats or sinks.Then,have them roll clay balls in graduated sizes from very tiny ones to two-inch balls. After formulating predictions, test and then discuss what take place to each ball when tested.Ask,-œDoes it go down or float? Why?-let kids to reveal on their experiences and observations. Independent Investigations Provide each group of kids with a small container of water, manipulative, and an inspection chart divided in half with the words sink or float and an equivalent picture of something sinking and something floating. Ask kids to make calculations, test objects, and then trace their observations on the chart using words and pictures to write about their findings. Physical Science by pre primary teacher training course Physical science comprises the study and explanation of matter,of energy,movement,and change.Theme:Magnets Sample Teacher-Guided Lesson:Mighty Magnets Display assorted art supplies. Glue two pieces of paper together and ask:-œWhat makes these pages stick together? What else can hold paper together,momentarily or permanently?- Provide time for kids to look at the art supplies,think,and answer.Explain that some objects hold together without glue,staples,or tape.They seem to hold together all by themselves.Show various magnets,and ask volunteers to select one to plunge into a container of mixed thumbtacks and paper clips.Provide time for the kids to explain what happens.Ask volunteers to select a magnet and try to pick up objects from a tray of manipulative.Talk about each object and whether or not it is attracted by the magnet.Have kids sort the objects into magnetize and not attract piles. As they look at the piles ask kids what they can wind up about magnets.Physical Science Center for Independent Investigations Provide different magnets such as a magnetic wand, a bar magnet, a magnetic marble,and a magnetic button and a box of paper clips. Kids envisage how many clips each magnet will magnetize and then find out how many clips are attracted to their magnets by experimenting with each.Kids count and write or draw the number of clips attracted to their magnets and then evaluate results and discuss:-œWhich magnet attracted the most clips?Which magnets were stronger,more dominant?Which were weaker?-rent magnets such as a magnetic wand, a bar magnet, a magnetic marble,and a magnetic button and a box of paper clips.Kids envisage how many clips each magnet will magnetize and then find out how many clips are attracted to their magnets by experimenting with each.Kids count and write or draw the number of clips attracted to their magnets and then evaluate results and discuss:-œWhich magnet attracted the most clips?Which magnets were stronger,more dominant?Which were weaker?
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Are you a science tutor Check whether you got these skills

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Science is a subject which has many branches like biochemistry, biology, chemistry, physics, archaeology etc. Being a science tutor is great and needs lot of efforts to pursue with teaching career. Well, all cannot aim to take science classes. There are many constraints to become a successful science tutor.  Below are necessary qualities that all science tutors should have: 1.Qualification: You need bachelor or PG degree to take science classes. One of the most important factors to enter into teaching career would be qualifications. When parents look into resume to hire private tutors to teach science subject, they will first see the qualification of the tutor and then their work experience.   2.Should show enthusiasm while teaching science: Ask yourself the following questions before taking each class, •Am I well prepared to take the session properly? •Can I clarify the doubts asked by students? •Am I clear with the concept that I am going to take today? •What home works should be given to students?

As private tutors, you should show interest while taking classes. If you look unmotivated students won’t get the spirit of listening to classes. 3.Make science classes interactive: If you are taking class for one hour, split the sections and plan accordingly. For example, if you take one-to-one science tutoring for an hour, then split the one hour class into three sections. First ten minutes you can ask questions from previously taken science concepts. Then for next 35 minutes, take class about new concepts in science. Last ten minutes give revision for over all summary of the class.  4.Help in lab classes: Some students may feel difficulty in handling lab classes. Thus go forward and help them to develop their practical knowledge. Use lab classes to make students understand all theoretical classes in practical way. Give bonus marks for students who perform well in practical sections. Thus it will boost the students to do well.  5.Provide examples: We know that science is a subject which has many scientifically terms to memorize. Thus provide examples for students to connect those terms to the real world. This makes them to learn science easily. In some cases, give funny examples or say them how you learn those words when you were a student. These attract students easily and make them involve into subjects.

6.Give home works and assignments: Through home works and assignments, you can track the performance of the students. You can analyze whether they understand the concepts you take. Give daily home works and weekly assignments. Make assignments as research topics. Thus students surf internet or do some research to complete the assignments.   7.Charge Reasonably: As personal tutors, you should know how to charge correctly. Charging too high or too low is not good. Keep an eye on fellow tutors and analyze how much they charge and allocate cost of tutoring accordingly. You might have followed few of these and missed some points. If you have handled all the techniques then it is well and good. You will be the award winning teacher. But if you have forgotten any of the above said strategies do follow them in future to be a good successful science tutor.
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Is Science Objective

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Scientists pride themselves on their objectivity. In fact, the subjective supposedly has no place in the process of scientific verification at all. There is a hypothesis that is based on facts and suppositions that have already been established, and the hypothesis then undergoes rigorous experimentation, testing, observation, and verification before it finally released out into the world as a 'fact.' Working theories are treated in a similar, though modified, way.In scientific circles, to suggest that science may in fact be based on subjective emotions would amount to heresy. But that might very well be the case. One of my favorite examples is the myth of Newton's apple. That an apple, falling from a tree and hitting the head of a young scientist should inspire him to go on to rewrite the entire physical laws of the universe is tremendously large and remarkable leap indeed. What 'exactly' was it that, in a flash, gave Newton the basic insight that would change the course of history.Another great example that is actually recorded for our benefit is Einstein's series of 'floating experiments.' As a bored patent clerk, Einstein spent a good deal of his time imaging himself in space, observing the earth and the effects of energy upon mass, among other things. These 'experiments' eventually led to the theory of relativity and nuclear power.Developments in science are often thought to come about through inspiration. No one has questioned or denied this. Yet, what does inspiration have anything at all to do with objectivity? Isn't inspiration in the world of the mysterious emotive phenomenon known as creativity? There is the familiar caricature of the light bulb going on in someone's head that has a new, brilliant idea. But where does it come from? It's as subjective as I can imagine.
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Living on the Fringe

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Fringe science, what's that? Well I'm glad you asked because it's an important aspect of science that is oft overlooked by mainstream society and, indeed, mainstream science. Simply put fringe science is any scientific inquiry in an established field of study that departs from mainstream theory and might not fit well in other categories of science. For example: There is mainstream science, this is a field of study that is widely accepted, often beyond the point of being called theoretical. The general public, in most cases accepts this as well as the majority, if not entirety of the scientific community. Beyond this there is Proto science. This is sound science, often not widely accepted or known, trying to establish itself and its legitimacy. Then there is fringe science. This is a science that departs significantly from what we man and may just as easily go the way of proto or mainstream science as it can pseudoscience. Pseudoscience is a claim or practice that is presented as scientific but lacks evidence, cannot be tested, does not adhere to a valid scientific method, or has other qualities of "bad science". Finally there is superstition which is a belief in the supernatural without proof other than often anecdotal evidence, feelings, etc. Fringe science, as you can see, is nestled right in the middle.Once upon a time the people of earth though the sun revolved around the earth and not the other way around. People also once thought that the historical city of Troy existed only in stories. The big bang theory and idea that the Norse once visited the North American continent are all examples of theories that were developed on the fringe. Just because a thought seems revolutionary or, to some, unsound, does not make it impossible. In fact, many, many things that we now all know to be true developed on the fringes of science and thinks to the effort of those passionate about what they do we live in a more enlightened world.This is when fringe science is at its best. Of course there are problems, especially when scientists allow their beliefs to dictate the methods by which they test their theory or when, even in light of concrete evidence, they refuse to accept reality. This is why tireless testing and retesting is necessary to foster an environment in which theories can make their way to becoming facts. Those testing said theories must be willing to try as earnestly to disprove their theory as they do prove it. It is then, that the wonderful study and quest that is science, becomes a beautiful and useful thing we can all benefit from.   
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Mastering the Art of Studying Science

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Being the only mandatory subject in the HSC, it’s unquestionable why English has the most number of HSC enrolees. Although Mathematics has become the most popular HSC elective subject, it is noticeable that the number of students who have chosen to study Science courses has been growing over the past couple of years. From the Board of Studies NSW’s list of Top 15 subjects by enrollment in 2010, Biology ranked 4th with 16,060 enrolees; Chemistry was 8th with 10,516; and Physics was 11th with 9,480. Other Science subjects have increased enrolment as well: Senior Science increased 26%, Earth and Environmental Science increased 29%.  Matrix Education Specialists in HSC Sciences, Math and English  As everyone awaits the release of the 2011 HSC results, it’s most likely that they will see a similar trend. For those students who will be preparing for HSC exams in the next couple of years and are planning to focus on the Sciences, you can continue improving your school marks and have the chance to achieve top HSC marks with Matrix Education’s help. As Sydney’s leading HSC tutoring school for Year 7 to 12 students, they specialise in English, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The majority of their students rank top at their schools and achieve an ATAR of above 95 because of Matrix Education’s state-of-the-art technology, effective learning system, and experienced teachers. They also provide other resources, such as supplementary workbooks, advanced curriculum, accelerated courses, an ATAR calculator, feedback and assessment, and more, to assist students in their individual needs.

   How to Study the Different Sciences Effectively  Aside from attending a tutoring school, it is also important that you follow a regular schedule for self-study. Unlike other subjects, the sciences have content that use technical language and many symbols; they are theory-oriented that require mastery of previous knowledge to understand new concepts. Just like in Math courses, it is important that you memorise and understand the definitions, take down good notes, solve the problems, and do the experiments. Theory and practical must go together. Here are some helpful tips that can make studying science less stressful:  •Biology -Read the lecture material in advance or before attending the class. -Participate actively in lab sessions and perform the experiments. -Take down notes and compare notes with a friend to fill in any gaps. -Read materials with a critical eye and attend lectures with a critical mind.  •Chemistry -Read actively – think about what you’re reading, relate it to previous concepts, and understand it.

  -Self test yourself – ask and answer questions about what you read. -Outline what you’ve read, using main ideas, important formulas and applications. -Spend enough time practicing by solving problems provided in the book or redoing homework exercises. -Don’t leave your questions or problems unanswered; review your materials or ask your instructor and classmates. -Take down lecture notes in outline form and read over them as soon as possible so you can rewrite what’s unclear or finish what’s incomplete to make them accurate.  -Observe keenly and participate actively during experiments.  •Physics -Remove all distractions when studying. -Get your homework done and redo the exercises later on. -Make sure you’ve mastered previous concepts and basic principles so you can correctly understand, analyze and solve current problems. -Practice solving different problems.  Science is a hands-on course so get involved in class, during experiments, and when doing homework and problem-solving exercises.

Matrix Education is a leading HSC tuition college known for inspiring and nurturing academic excellence. They provide students with a curriculum of the highest quality in a friendly, caring environment that offers strong student support through in-depth HSC tutorials for concept mastery and conversion of their HSC marks into ATAR through their online ATAR calculator.
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High School Science For Home schoolers

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I recently had an interesting conversation with a few home school parents of middle school age children who are in the process of making plans for high school. In the process, they raised quite a few questions that I think many other parents also wonder about.  Since these parents know me as their children’s science teacher, our conversation naturally centered on science education. Fundamentally, we were discussing two things. First, what does a good, high school science education consist of? And second, what do colleges want to see?  Science is such a broad topic that it isn’t at all obvious what subjects high school students should study. Of course, a year each of biology, chemistry, and physics is traditional, but why? Why isn’t Earth science, which deals with some of the most important issues of our day, such as climate, part of that core curriculum? Is it ok to substitute more specialized classes such as astronomy, botany, or forensics for the more traditional classes? Should students study only the branches of science that they most enjoy?

There is no clear answer to these questions; the conclusions that people come to will have as much to do with opinions and preferences as they will with facts. Personally, I think that while biology, chemistry, and physics are all great, Earth science is just as good and ought to be in the spotlight more than it is. I suspect it gets short shrift because of the far-reaching influence of medical schools, which all require applicants to take biology, chemistry, and physics, but not Earth science. In my opinion, relatively broad survey courses should make up the greater portion of high school science, but adding in one or two specialized classes can be wonderful, particularly if they are in addition to the more general classes. If specialized classes replace too many broad survey classes, my concern is that students will not get enough background information to formulate an accurate picture of the way the world works.  Even though it is undoubtedly possible for students to get a great high school science education in very non-traditional ways, that strategy is risky. Some colleges, especially small liberal arts colleges, would undoubtedly look on unusual courses of study kindly, but most colleges will want to see SAT Subject Tests and AP Exams. In New York State, Regents exams may also be important. Notably, many of the schools most likely to de-emphasize standardized tests are very expensive, so unless money is not an issue, it makes a lot of sense to work hard to get some strong test scores. This is especially important for home schoolers, who probably need to take at least 5 SAT Subject tests if they plan to apply to selective colleges. Therefore, it is necessary to include, and probably emphasize, classes that will let students shine on these tests. The only three SAT Subject tests in science are biology, chemistry, and physics. Doing well on AP exams is also a reliable way to impress colleges, so these tests should be taken into account as well. There are AP exams in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. Regents, which can be important in New York State (and especially for SUNY and CUNY schools), offer tests in biology (called Living Environment), chemistry, physics, and Earth science.

The parents that I had my recent conversation with have daughters who are strongly biased towards the humanities. They like science, but they like English and history more. They do well in math, but they don’t get much enjoyment out of it. With this in mind, they’re currently considering a two-year program of Earth science for 8th and 9th grades that will allow the girls to take the Earth science regents at the end of 9th grade, a two-year biology course that will allow the girls to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology at the end of 11th grade (and the Living Environment Regents Exam, for those of them who will be applying to SUNY or CUNY schools), and a one year conceptual physics class in 12th grade which will not be linked with any standardized test. Chemistry is notably absent from this regimen because it isn’t safe to do high school chemistry in the home. Hopefully, at least some of the kids will take a chemistry class in community college or at a school that allows homes choolers to take classes a la carte.  This plan should work reasonable well for this group of kids. They will go off to college with some holes in their science education, but they have four full years of exposure to data analysis, experimental design, and critical thinking. Hopefully, they will have all the skills they need to be scientifically literate and all the tests they need to get into colleges that will satisfy their needs.
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